Macron Confronts Growing Unrest – Foreign Policy

Welcome to today’s Morning Brief, in which we focus on France restlessnessBritish Prime Minister Liz Truss political implosionand Russia’s declaration of martial law in four Ukrainian regions.

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Mass strikes sweep France

Welcome to today’s Morning Brief, in which we focus on France restlessnessBritish Prime Minister Liz Truss political implosionand Russia’s declaration of martial law in four Ukrainian regions.

If you would like to receive Morning Briefs in your inbox every weekday, please sign up here.


Mass strikes sweep France

The French authorities have made efforts to respond mass strikes and protests that have been shaking and acutely triggering the country for weeks fuel shortage and travel disruptions.

Although the strikes first began among oil refinery workers, they have also spread in recent days of the country nursing, nuclear energy and transit sectors, among others. From teachers to railway staff, more than 100,000 People demonstrated across the country on Tuesday to demand higher wages.

The effects have been felt across France, which is now struggling with severe problems gas shortage exacerbated by oil refinery workers’ strikes. Nearly 30 percent French petrol stations’ fuel stocks have now run dry, compared to Tuesday’s strikes Train traffic was also severely restricted.

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The far-reaching scale of the unrest underscores public frustration at rising inflation and the government’s response – and also poses a major challenge to President Emmanuel Macron. When long queues formed at gas stations, he had to order one emergency meeting Earlier this week about the ongoing strikes.

His opponents, meanwhile, have capitalized on the unrest. On Sunday, tens of thousands of people took part in protests organized by a group of Macron’s left-wing rivals before the strikes; They focused on the rising cost of living in France.

“You can see that here movement is beginning to spread,” Mathilde Panot, the parliamentary leader of the France Unbowed party, told Radio Franceinfo.

The ongoing unrest in France is part of a broader pattern of public frustration that has plagued Europe as it struggles to deal with a severe energy crisis that has resulted in skyrocketing energy bills. There have also been protests and strikes in recent weeks involved Germany, Great Britain, Czech Republic, Hungary and Belgium.

As anger boiled over, protesters and authorities tussled 11 people were arrested during Tuesday’s protests in Paris. On Wednesday, some oil refineries halted strikes while others continued.


What we’re tracking today

Britain’s Political Troubles. British Prime Minister Liz Truss’ political career is hanging by a thread after she was grilled in Parliament on Wednesday – which prompted her to declare: “I am a fighter, not a slacker.” Her statement followed the resignation of Home Secretary Suella Braverman – allegedly for abusive private email use.

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Braverman – a right wing favorite of the Conservative Party – took the opportunity to fire a broadside at Truss, who has moved to the center as the government’s economic agenda has stalled. “I have concerns about the direction of this administration,” Braverman wrote in her resignation letter. “Not only have we broken important commitments promised to our constituents, I have serious concerns about this government’s obligation to honor the Manifesto commitments.”

Russia declares martial law. This was stated by Russian President Vladimir Putin martial law in the four Ukrainian territories he illegally annexed. The announcement allows officials to unroll a lot New ruleswhile highlighting those of the Russian leader own military challenges. “In the current situation, I consider it necessary to give additional powers to the leaders of all Russian regions,” he said said.


Somalia’s catastrophic drought. Thousands of Somali children are at risk of “dying on a scale not seen in half a century” as Somalia struggles the most acute droughtt in four decades, according to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). Since August, 44,000 children in Somalia have been hospitalized for severe acute malnutrition, the equivalent of one child admitted every minute, according to UNICEF.

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Prison explosion in Myanmar. At least 8 people were killed after two explosive devices detonated at a prison in Myanmar known for housing political prisoners on Wednesday. The bombing killed three prison staff and five visitors, while injuring 13 others. The Special Task Agency of Burma, an anti-government organization, has reportedly claimed responsibility for the bombing.


Ukraine is the world’s foreign policy Rorschach test by Stephen M Walt

Why Putin is escalating the airstrikes in Ukraine by Ravi Agrawal

The thaw on Russia’s periphery has already begun by Daniel B. Baer


Liz Truss may say she’s “a fighter, not a slacker,” but can she fight long enough to survive an unrefrigerated head of lettuce? A British tabloid that Daily StarHe put this question to the test with an a Live broadcast of the two competitors battling for victory. At left is a framed photo of Truss; a head of lettuce on the right complete with Big eyes, a smile, a blond wig, blue shoes and glasses.

This lettuce has currently been out for six full days and is entering its seventh; The vegetables usually begin to wilt after seven to 10 days—although if they’re refrigerated, they say New York Times. On Wednesday night, the Lettuce wore an eye mask to help him sleep.

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