Army Installation Services Director visits Fort Carson – Fort Carson Mountaineer


FORT CARSON, Colo. – Fort Carson Fire Department assistant fire chief Mitchum Van Dyke briefs Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and deputy chief of staff at the Army Department's G-9 Headquarters, during a tour of the department's fire headquarters at the Butts Army Heliport , September 14, 2022. (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

FORT CARSON, Colo. – Fort Carson Fire Department assistant fire chief Mitchum Van Dyke briefs Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and deputy chief of staff at the Army Department’s G-9 Headquarters, during a tour of the department’s fire headquarters at the Butts Army Heliport , September 14, 2022. (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

By Jordan McCulley

Fort Carson Office of Public Affairs
FORT CARSON, Colo. – A Rocky Mountain Arsenal employee briefs Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and deputy chief of staff at the Army Department's G-9 Headquarters, Sept. 15, 2022, at the site of the Basin A Neck treatment system.  The Bassin A Neck treatment system is one of five groundwater treatment plant locations at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal.  (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

FORT CARSON, Colo. – A Rocky Mountain Arsenal employee briefs Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and deputy chief of staff at the Army Department’s G-9 Headquarters, Sept. 15, 2022, at the site of the Basin A Neck treatment system. The Bassin A Neck treatment system is one of five groundwater treatment plant locations at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal. (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

FORT CARSON, CO — Michael Reheuser, Director of Installation Services for the Department of the Army, visited Fort Carson September 14-15, 2022 at the Turkey Creek Fire Station and Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Reheuser is responsible for housing, environmental issues and logistics policies, programs and resources for military facilities worldwide.

READ:  Who is Acun İlicali? » Expat Guide Turkey

“When you work at the Pentagon, you first get an overview of what’s going on in the installation,” Reheuser said. “You can see for yourself how big the problems are and which problems need to be addressed.”

Reheuser’s portfolio includes monitoring the army’s fire departments.

“By visiting facilities and seeing the fire stations and talking to the firefighters, I can better understand their training needs and the issues that are important to them. So if I advocate for these resources with senior Army leaders, I can do better than that,” Reheuser said.

Mitchum Van Dyke, Assistant Fire Chief for the Fort Carson Fire Department, met with Reheuser in Turkey Creek to give him a tour of the Turkey Creek Fire Department.

The Turkey Creek Fire Department is one of the first responders for Highway 115. Because the fire station is located between Fort Carson and Cañon City, they are the first to respond to an emergency call in the area.

READ:  Preview: Turkey vs. Luxembourg - prediction, team news, lineups

Upon returning to the Butts Army Heliport in Fort Carson, Reheuser was about to tour the new Fire Station location at Gate 6.

“I didn’t realize how many new buildings were created that improved the soldiers’ quality of life. Especially new facilities and barracks,” said Reheuser.

FORT CARSON, Colorado — Lt. Col. Scott Nelson, director of emergency services and commander of the 759th Military Police Battalion, briefs Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and G-9 Headquarters deputy chief of staff for the Department of the Army, on Turkey Creek's emergency services and how helping the surrounding areas, September 14, 2022. (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

FORT CARSON, Colorado — Lt. Col. Scott Nelson, director of emergency services and commander of the 759th Military Police Battalion, briefs Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and G-9 Headquarters deputy chief of staff for the Department of the Army, on Turkey Creek’s emergency services and how helping the surrounding areas, September 14, 2022. (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

Reheuser retired as a naval officer and was a former trial attorney. He has the experience and skills to conceptualize and describe service member concerns from a global Army perspective.

READ:  Iran and Russia seek new sanctions evasion corridor – Aze.Media

“I broadly understand the issues we are dealing with in the installation portfolio,” said Reheuser. “Working as a lawyer helps me to tackle complex issues and explain them to senior executives who have numerous responsibilities and significant time constraints.”

He also received a brief introduction to the Emergency Communications Center.

Recently, the ECC conducted an extensive exercise simulation to test response time when there is an emergency situation that would affect the mission at Fort Carson. The ECC has successfully completed the simulation.

Reheuser concluded his tour of Fort Carson with a trip to Rocky Mountain Arsenal on September 15, 2022. In addition to being a conservation area, RMA has a mission to restore the environment to pre-Army conditions. RMA includes five groundwater treatment plants, two hazardous waste landfills, and two ground cover systems that protect the environment from contaminated soils. The Army continuously assesses that harmful by-products generated by previous Army operations at RMA do not affect public health and the environment.

“It was important for him (Reheuser) to see one of the Army’s largest environmental cleanup projects firsthand,” said Charles Scharmann, program manager at Rocky Mountain Arsenal. “The Army’s role was to clean up the site so 15,000 acres could be turned over to the US Fish and Wildlife Service and incorporated into the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Army now maintains approximately 1,200 acres of land (landfills, cover systems, and groundwater treatment facilities) that could not be transferred to the USFWS.”

Whether it’s the Turkey Creek Fire Department or the RMA, community partnerships contribute to the quality of life of soldiers and their families.

“I was really impressed with the teammates in the installation and in the local areas,” said Reheuser. “From meeting the people and seeing what they do, I have learned once again to appreciate the skills and values ​​they bring to Fort Carson and the larger Army enterprise.”

FORT CARSON, Colo. — Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and deputy chief of staff at the Army Department's G-9 Headquarters, looks at a map dated Sept. 14, 2022 that will place a new fire station at Gate 6 Tom Joyce, deputy garrison commander, points out details about the new project of the fire station.  (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)

FORT CARSON, Colo. — Michael Reheuser, director of installation services and deputy chief of staff at the Army Department’s G-9 Headquarters, looks at a map dated Sept. 14, 2022 that will place a new fire station at Gate 6 Tom Joyce, deputy garrison commander, points out details about the new project of the fire station. (Photo by Jordyn McCulley)





Source link